Tag: writing advice


Articles / On Dialogue

Over the last few days, a picture has shown up in my Facebook timeline over and over again. The caption reads “190 Ways to Say ‘Said.’ ” Grammatical issues aside—the synonyms are actually all present tense, so they’re 190 ways to say say—it was causing a buzz in my timeline. If you’ve seen it, chances are you’ve had one of two reactions: 1) woo hoo,...

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Articles

So we’re back with part two of our misspelled and misused foreign phrases. I really hope you enjoyed part one and found some of the information helpful. Since I had so much fun with the word Kummerspeck, which, if you read part one, you’d know is German for the excess weight gained from emotional overeating. Literally translated, it’s grief bacon. Today’s phrase is l’esprit de...

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Articles

Using foreign phrases can be beneficial to your manuscript, not only because they add flair, but because sometimes they just sound better or more aptly fit certain situations in your novel. Not to mention that there are actually foreign terms for which there are no English words. Kummerspeck, for example, is German for the excess weight gained from emotional overeating. Literally translated, it’s grief bacon....

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Recs

Divas Recommend: 7 Signs Your Novel Is Doomed And How to Avoid Them By Kim Mills I love articles about writing pitfalls and the tips and tricks authors use to avoid them. This article, 7 Signs Your Novel Is Doomed And How to Avoid Them by Kim Mills at Writer’s Haven, is a gem because not only does it break down the habits that can doom your novel from...

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Articles / On Writing

Character Consistency How many times have you been reading something and out of nowhere there’s an odd change to a character that comes with no explanation? Nothing inconsequential, of course—something substantial, like eye color or body type or a huge personality change that goes unexplained? Are you the type of reader who would notice that sort of thing? As an editor, I have to be. During...

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Articles / Commonly Confused

Nauseated and Nauseous   Conversation overheard between a snarky editor and her victi—er, author: “Ugh. All these changes! I swear you make me nauseous!” “I make you able to cause nausea? Sweet! I am all-powerful!” “No, jerk, you make me sick.” “Grammatically speaking, then, I make you nauseated.” “Fine. Whatever. You make me nauseated.” “Cool! Now I’m nauseous!” As far as grammar is concerned, the...

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Articles / On Dialogue

Gimme More—Using Creative Narrative Instead of Dialogue Tags If you’ve read my series on dialogue tags—or if you know me, have met me, or have ever been in my general proximity—you’d know that I’m a student of the “Less is More” school of dialogue tags. I’m not a fan of creative dialogue tags, and I’m a firm believer that unless you have a room full...

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Articles / On Dialogue

Dialogue Tags, Part II In my earlier article, Dialogue Tag Primer, we looked at the basics of punctuating dialogue tags, some commonly accepted rules to what constitutes a dialogue tag and what is a creative tag, and the challenge to generally use fewer tags in your writing. In this segment, we’ll talk more in depth about some other types of punctuation, how the placement of...

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Commonly Confused: Three Common Pairs Articles / Commonly Confused

Commonly Confused: Three Common Pairs   Imply and Infer: Imply and infer are commonly confused because, while they don’t really sound alike, their meanings are tied together like two halves of a whole. Similar to give and take or teach and learn, imply and infer are opposite sides of the same situation. A speaker, writer, or other information-giver implies something that a reader, listener, or...

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Articles / On Dialogue

Dialogue Tag Primer Sometimes it’s good to just get back to the basics when it comes to writing, so I decided to tackle an area that has some set rules and yet also some guidelines or schools of thought that can vary. Dialogue tags fall into this category because while capitalization and punctuation around a dialogue tag is generally rule-driven, what constitutes a dialogue tag...

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