Tag: setting


Articles / On Writing

Divas on Writing Setting Sheets I talked about character sheets a while ago and had some really great responses to the article, so I thought I would write about setting sheets as well. Setting sheets work much the same as character sheets, but they storyboard the setting of the story instead of outlining characters. With character sheets, you’re likely to have multiple sheets based on...

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Recs

Diva Recommend Creating a Setting by Taylor Lindstrom I may not be a guy but I am a fan of the Men with Pens blog. And today’s rec is a great straightforward article about how to craft a story setting. It’s by the lone gal over at the unabashed good ol’ boy writing network. Are you struggling with using an existing city in your book or...

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Articles / On Writing

Using Everyday Life to Improve Your Story If you’ve read any of my writing articles, you know I’m a huge proponent of writing what you know. Often authors try to write about topics, settings, or situations of which they have little or no working knowledge, and this can become shockingly clear within the first few pages. One of the ways to write what you know...

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Articles / On Writing

Keep it Consistent – Settings   Your setting encompasses the large and the small in your book. From the state that your story is set in to the town to the home in which most of the story happens. Because you are working with a visual element in a medium of the written word, it can be hard to keep the overall picture straight in...

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Articles / On Writing

Quick Tip: Magically Moving Characters   Have you ever noticed that sometimes characters just appear in scenes or move without action? Yeah? Me too. And it drives me crazy to be honest. Now you may wonder why that is a problem? Well, it’s because it disconnects the characters from the story. And it is in that moment that they become pawns instead of characters. Characters...

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Articles / On Writing

Writing What You Know So we’ve all heard the old adage before—write what you know. Which is great if you’re a pirate, an alien, a billionaire, or a nineteenth-century courtesan. But what if you’re not? Well, you could still write what you know, but I can’t imagine anyone out there wants me to write a book about accounting. Unless it’s to be used as a...

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Articles / On Writing

Divas On Writing: Where The Heck Are We?   Recently I read a book for my personal book blog The Flirty Reader that left me scratching my head, and it wasn’t because of a confusing plotline or lack of development. It was the lack of proper setting. In this book the author used many words with British spelling, which would indicate to me that the book...

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Recs

Today on Divas Recommend, we chose this article by author A.M. Harte called The 4 Basic Elements of a Story. Why, you may ask? Well, when the first few words are “Writing is like baking a cake,” I’m pretty much sold. So go read about how this author compares creating a story to baking a cake. Enjoy!


Articles / On Writing

The Benefits of a Style Sheet Some authors write according to an outline, and others have a less-organized series of events they want to describe. There are authors who write their scenes sequentially, no matter how great or small, and those who write major scenes first and minor scenes last. I’ve even known one writer who wrote all her sex scenes first—she said they were...

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Articles / On Editing

Manuscript Assessment A manuscript assessment has several names: assessment, critique, analysis, evaluation, etc. But what does it do? It is an editor’s evaluation of a story as a whole. It points out the strengths and weaknesses of a manuscript to help the author find problem areas at an early stage in the writing and polishing process. The assessment looks at several areas that contribute to...

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