Tag: redundancy


Articles / On Writing

Redundancy Redundancy invades our writing like a weed, sending runners underground to choke and bog down our stories. Many of us don’t realize we are adding redundant or unnecessary words to our writing. I’d like to discuss some of the redundancies I see most often and ways to streamline your writing and eliminate the redundancy. Body Movement Redundancy More often than not I hear and...

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Articles / On Writing

 Divas on Writing: Is Your Story Bloated? Raven’s iPhone rang, and she removed it from her pocket, swiped the screen from left to right, and glared at the unfamiliar number. Annoyed by the unidentified number, she tapped the green answer button to connect the call, put the phone to her ear, and prepared to give whoever it was a piece of her mind. One thing...

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Articles / On Writing

Featured Article: Redundant Perspectives   Redundancy can be a real killer in your story—and not in the good way. Whether it is stating the obvious, showing and then telling, defining character actions, or worst of the worst, replaying a scene from a different point of view. This type of redundancy can happen in story or in a second story that retells the events of the...

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Articles / On Writing

Quick Tip: Hold that Breath!   He breathes. She is breathing. They take a deep breath. He exhales. She inhales. It sucks in a shuddering breath and lets it out through its nose. His breathing is loud. Her chest rose and fell silently… My quick tip would be to never use this type of phrasing in your story, ever, and to just trust me on...

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Articles / On Writing

CREATIVE EXHAUSTION Last month, I wrote about overstaging. In it I covered the propensity for new authors to over direct their descriptions, settings, characters, and plots. This over directing can lead to a whole host of problems, which we will cover in part here. Overstaging is a progressive trap. It begins with an author who keeps an iron-clad grip on their novel, characters, and plot....

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Articles / On Editing

5 Ways to Cut the Wordiness in Your Manuscript   Have you received a rejection letter that says “Wordy!”? Has your editor asked you to cut some of the clutter? Do you want to streamline your submission to improve your chances of publication? Here are some quick tips that can help: 1. Search for phrases like started to, began to, headed to, decided to, reached...

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