Tag: novel


Articles / On Dialogue

Direct and Indirect Narrative   The difference between direct and indirect narrative is pretty straightforward. Direct narrative is basically describing everything in a scene, including all the action and detail. For example, say you’re writing a scene about pitcher throwing the winning strike in the game. Direct narrative allows you to describe everything from what the pitcher is feeling and  seeing to how he pitches...

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Articles / On Dialogue

Divas On Dialogue: Dialogue Punctuation   The are three ways to punctuate dialogue in your novel: the right way, the wrong way, and a mixture of the them both. Kind of confusing, huh? To some it can be. Do you use a comma or period with this tag, or do you capitalize the first word after the quotation? Talking about dialogue punctuation is one thing,...

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Recs

Divas Recommend: 3 Steps to Recycling Your Half-Finished Novels by Joe Bunting I love it when I come across an article that helps me make something useful out of one of my creations languishing away because of lack of interest or a creative roadblock. Joe Bunting’s article “3 Steps to Recycling Your Half-Finished Novels” found on the The Write Practice website is just such an...

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Recs

The Divas Recommend ~oOo~ So, you’ve published your book, but it’s not selling the way you’d hoped or expected it to. Well why not? With that in mind, this week the divas recommend David Gaughran’s blog post: Why Is My Book Not Selling? ~oOo~


Diva Chat

National Write a Novel Month (NaNoWriMo) is starting in a few days. Are you ready to take the challenge? A few years ago two of my friends made the commitment to NaNoWriMo, and they asked me to join them. My workload at the time was too heavy, and I had to decline, but I did support them. One friend successfully completed her novel and the...

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Articles / On Genre

I love historical fiction, whether it be a dramatization of real events, a what-if scenario, or a time travel. I have yet to find a well-written historical novel I didn’t liked. Now let me make myself clear. I like historical fiction. I’m not the scholarly type who dives into real history and vets out every minute detail of the era, unless I’m writing a novel....

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On Genre / Special

…and they lived happily ever after. Trite though it may sound, according to Romance Writers of America, a happy ending or “an emotionally satisfying and optimistic ending” is one of only two requirements for a story to be classified under the Romance genre. In order to meet both requirements, the story must also revolve around the romantic relationship between the two main characters. The love...

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