Tag: mundane detail


Articles / On Writing

Revising Mundane Content We’re all guilty of it at one time or another. Don’t lie. Even best-selling authors fall victim to mundane content. It sneaks into our writing disguised as description and detail we think will add to our story when, in fact, it bogs it down. “But my descriptions are necessary to make my scenes fuller,” you say. Not all description is necessary and...

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Articles / On Writing

 Divas on Writing: Is Your Story Bloated? Raven’s iPhone rang, and she removed it from her pocket, swiped the screen from left to right, and glared at the unfamiliar number. Annoyed by the unidentified number, she tapped the green answer button to connect the call, put the phone to her ear, and prepared to give whoever it was a piece of her mind. One thing...

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Articles / On Writing

CREATIVE EXHAUSTION Last month, I wrote about overstaging. In it I covered the propensity for new authors to over direct their descriptions, settings, characters, and plots. This over directing can lead to a whole host of problems, which we will cover in part here. Overstaging is a progressive trap. It begins with an author who keeps an iron-clad grip on their novel, characters, and plot....

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Articles / On Writing

Keep it Simple, Silly!   KISS: Keep It Simple, Silly. That’s a cleaned-up version of a mantra most of us have heard time and time again. Keep it simple. And I’d never call anyone… well, you know. So silly works better for me. I find I use the word simplify rather often in my notes to authors, and it struck me that this could be...

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Articles / On Genre

Divas on Genre: Mystery Fiction   Contemporary mystery fiction is also known as crime fiction or detective fiction and has earned the moniker of “the whodunit.” It’s a relatively new genre, having developed over the last two hundred years in direct correlation with increased levels of organized police forces. Early mysteries, such as The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe (1841) and The...

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On Writing

Writing Pitfall #10: Rushed or Slow Pacing   Nothing can ruin a good story faster than rushed pacing. If you’ve ever read a story, stopped, and blinked, all the while thinking, “wait, what just happened here?” then you know what I mean. But just as bad as rushed pacing is a slow, lagging narrative. You know the kind—where you fight the urge to click the...

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On Writing

Writing Pitfall #7: Over Description   One of the many pitfalls of writing is over description. We’ve heard the writing advice “describe what your see” or “paint the scene with words.” But sometimes too much is just… too much. The one thing over description does really well is slow a story down. But over description can do more than simply slow a story. Many times...

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Tips

How to Revise Mundane Content Today’s quick tip is a lesson in how to revise a scene that is overwhelmed with mundane content. Mundane content is a type of dull filler. It can be anything from boring scenes of everyday life to extraneous detail to humdrum descriptions. Mundane content acts a type camouflage, and it masks what’s really important in your book. It can hamper...

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On Writing

Writing Pitfall #4: Mundane Detail   Back when I first started writing, I thought details were the meat and potatoes of my stories; the more the better is what I always thought. I had no qualms about writing the step-by-step of how my characters cooked spaghetti, how their shower routines consisted of lather, rinse, repeat with their specifically scented shampoo while their soap was a...

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