Tag: Common Mistakes


Articles

So we’re back with part two of our misspelled and misused foreign phrases. I really hope you enjoyed part one and found some of the information helpful. Since I had so much fun with the word Kummerspeck, which, if you read part one, you’d know is German for the excess weight gained from emotional overeating. Literally translated, it’s grief bacon. Today’s phrase is l’esprit de...

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Articles

Using foreign phrases can be beneficial to your manuscript, not only because they add flair, but because sometimes they just sound better or more aptly fit certain situations in your novel. Not to mention that there are actually foreign terms for which there are no English words. Kummerspeck, for example, is German for the excess weight gained from emotional overeating. Literally translated, it’s grief bacon....

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Recs

Divas Recommend: 7 Signs Your Novel Is Doomed And How to Avoid Them By Kim Mills I love articles about writing pitfalls and the tips and tricks authors use to avoid them. This article, 7 Signs Your Novel Is Doomed And How to Avoid Them by Kim Mills at Writer’s Haven, is a gem because not only does it break down the habits that can doom your novel from...

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Articles / Commonly Confused

In this episode of Commonly Confused, I’m going to discuss the commonly confused pairs ascent/assent and descent/decent. Although dissent may have seemed a more likely choice, given its meaning, I find it’s not misused nearly as often as decent is in this situation. Let’s start at the bottom. From Merriam-Webster, ascent is the act of ascending or rising; a moving or mounting upward. In layman’s terms,...

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Commonly Confused: Three Common Pairs Articles / Commonly Confused

Commonly Confused: Three Common Pairs   Imply and Infer: Imply and infer are commonly confused because, while they don’t really sound alike, their meanings are tied together like two halves of a whole. Similar to give and take or teach and learn, imply and infer are opposite sides of the same situation. A speaker, writer, or other information-giver implies something that a reader, listener, or...

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Recs

Divas Recommend: “Top Ten Grammar Myths” by Mignon Fogarty aka Grammar Girl I love Grammar Girl! Mignon Fogarty is one of my favorite go-to bloggers when I’m stuck and need a quick answer… and I’m too frazzled to search through CMoS (Chicago Manual of Style) to find it. Her section on Grammar at Quick and Dirty Tips is bookmarked on my laptop for easy reference....

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Articles / Commonly Confused

Commonly Confused: Four Less Common Pairs I love words. I get a kick out of twisting a sentence around or subtly shifting its meaning with the replacement of one little word. From passive to aggressive or formal to casual, the switch of a noun or verb can make all the difference in your phrase… or sentence… or paragraph. It’s vital, therefore, to ensure you’re always...

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Articles / Commonly Confused

Commonly Confused: Complement and Compliment Today’s commonly confused pair is actually not so commonly confused, it just happened to be a pair I saw in something I was working on.  I’m a total word nerd, so I like understanding why we use certain words in one circumstance and certain words in another.  So I researched complement/complementary and compliment/complimentary. According to Merriam-Webster: Complement:  Noun—Something that fills...

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Articles / Commonly Confused

Commonly Confused: Wrack and Rack In our series on commonly confused terms, we’ve come across some very common terms, but this article focuses on a pair of terms that, while commonly confused, aren’t quite a part of everyday speech. The verbs wrack and rack are both transitive verbs, which means they take a direct object. Both words have noun forms, but here I’m just focusing...

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Articles / Commonly Confused

Commonly Confused: Lie versus Lay You know that one grammar mistake that will stop you in your tracks and send your hackles up, no matter what, no matter where, no matter how often you read it? Yeah. For me, that’s anytime I see a misuse of the commonly confused pair lie versus lay. Why are these two confused so often? I think it’s for two reasons, actually. But first,...

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