Tag: Aspiring Authors


Writing Exercises

It’s your big chance. The one  you’ve been waiting for. She’s always been a little too pretty, he’s knows a little too much, or they’re just a little too perfect. So let loose with this writing exercise and kill them. You heard me. Become the grim reaper and cause the death of a main character… take that character away to their final judgment. Since it’s just...

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On Writing

Writing Pitfall #6: Mary Sue   As a first-time author, the level of relief and accomplishment matches only your excitement when you turn in your manuscript after weeks and months of writing. So imagine for a moment that your editor returns it with a big, red note on it that says “Get rid of Mary Sue!” Your first reaction, like any new writer, is probably...

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Ask the Divas

I was asked today, “What are your biggest editing pet peeves?” Immediately, I thought of a myriad of things. But when I really got to thinking about it, there are just a few things I find grating, which can be addressed beforehand by authors.  The simplest mistakes an author will make are the most common and ultimately very annoying and redundant for editors. Not that...

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Writing Exercises

Today’s writing exercise is about using your senses. It ties into Tuesday’s writing prompt, which asked you to imagine the smell of freshly cut grass and then let that scent take hold of your imagination. Instead of a prompt, the exercise today is to use your senses to establish a scene so a reader can step in and see what you see, hear what you...

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On Writing

Writing Pitfall #5: Head Hopping   In today’s article, #5 in our series on writing pitfalls for new authors, we will deal with head hopping. Head hopping stems from a lack of understanding of third person perspectives. To properly understand head hopping, we must first review the different types of point of view (POV). Like the first person POV, third person limited is a close perspective that...

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Writing Exercises

In today’s writing exercise, write from a child’s perspective. It can sometimes be difficult to write from the eyes of a child. Many authors get caught up in capturing their dialogue or child speak and nothing else.  The real challenge is getting into the mindset of the child while maintaining a narrative that’s clear and concise. Here are a few ground rules for you: The...

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Writing Prompts

The writing prompt for this week is a phrase to help authors work a little humor into their repertoire. Humor tends to be one of those areas in writing that authors either excel or struggle with. There’s not a lot of middle ground here. Mostly because comedy is bound to the sense of humor of the individual reader. When a writer possesses a talent for...

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Articles

We have all done it. No, really; it’s okay to admit it. No one here will judge you. It’s a part of the writing process, like it or not.  All you have to do is say it out loud and admit it to yourself: My name is *insert name* and I have had revision angst problems for *insert a ungodly amount of time*. There, now...

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Ask the Divas

Should I research when writing a novel? Writers have an unspoken agreement with readers to suspend disbelief when they begin a story. Readers willingly do this because they’re in it for the enjoyment of getting lost in a good book. But as a general rule, people will suspend disbelief only so far. Push the envelope too much and you’ll end up with reviews about your...

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Writing Prompts

In today’s writing prompt, we are going to explore emotion. We want you to express the emotional state of the girl pictured. Dig deep into her life and thoughts. Take your time, make the most of every word. The purpose is to take this character from a two-dimensional rendering to a three-dimensional person full of life and feelings.  You have three hundred words. Go. Please...

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