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Happy Release Day: “The Revenger” By Debra Anastasia

Posted by on Feb 22, 2016 in Diva Promotions | 2 comments

Happy Release Day: “The Revenger” By Debra Anastasia

Happy release day, Debra Anastasia, and congratulations on the release of The Revenger! Summary: The real hero of this story is dead. You should have met him. He was a beautiful man. The love of my life. I didn’t deserve him. Now what’s left are the jagged edges of the person I am without him, and what I have to do to get by. This isn’t even a story about love. Not really. It’s a twisted tale of revenge and hate—a happily never after. The only man in my life now is the one I have to kill. I’m Savvy Raine. I used to be a wife. I used to be a mother. Now I am the Revenger.   Excerpt: “What the hell are you?” He searched frantically for the door latch, his panic making him oblivious to the open top of the Jeep above him. He didn’t deserve an answer, and he wouldn’t get one. Only in her head would she respond. She pulled him from the backseat and held him aloft, thinking, I’m a mom without a reason. I’m a person without a life. I’m dead with no escape.   Review: I am constantly overwhelmed by the amount of talent Debra Anastasia has. I’ve yet to meet anyone who can craft a tale the way she can, drawing you in so that you believe the unbelievable—suspend your logical mind and just allow her words to wrap around you and make you witness to the story as if there should never be a doubt about their legitimacy. The Revenger is her latest tale, and it opens with such pain—a woman who’s lost her husband and her daughter to an accident she feels she’s responsible for—I teared up from the image of her at their unmarked gravestone. For a year, Savvy’s been a ghost of a person, eating because that’s what you do, bathing for the same reason, but not living. Her brother Toby keeps an eye on her, making sure she doesn’t try to harm herself—again. But she’s got no purpose anymore. A year after the accident, Savvy is just trying to find a way to end it all when suddenly she’s different. Her vision is clearer, she can hear more acutely, and her strength—where did it come from? She sees people differently, too. The bad guys are now crystal clear to Savvy. Is this her purpose? Was she spared from death to stop the criminals? The rage she feels is new and powerful, and it gives her a sense of purpose until she comes across the person truly responsible for the death of her husband and daughter. Is revenge why she’s still alive? Or is her purpose something deeper than revenge? Can she restrain these new instincts to kill and instead, show the killer her truth? That’s about all I’m going say for now because I don’t want to spoil anything. However, this story takes you on so many twists and turns and ups and downs it should be a roller coaster. I honestly thought I had it all worked out a third of the way in, and let me tell you, I was wrong, wrong, wrong! And that made me so crazy happy! I love when an author can surprise me with plot twists and unexpected turns....

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Write Divas Character Sheets Are Here!

Posted by on Feb 19, 2016 in Special Features | 2 comments

Write Divas Character Sheets Are Here!

I wrote about making your own character sheets last year right around this time. You can find that article HERE.  In honor of the one year anniversary of my article, I thought it would be a great time to have pre-made character sheets available to our readers! YAY! Simply, download the Character Sheets PDF and you’re golden. There is no arguing that using these types of sheets can be very helpful while writing your book. It’s an easy go-to for basic information on each character. Since we all tend to forget the details sometimes, using sheets are a no-brainer. The Write Divas Character Sheet is our gift for you. Print it out, fill in the blanks, take notes, sketch character likeness, laminate it…whatever you want. It’s an easy reference that we took the work out, making it easier for you to organize your planning and research before, during, and after you write your manuscripts. Look ahead for Write Diva Setting Sheets and Plot Sheets. The Divas and I want you to write the best you can with the best tools you can find. Any little bit helps and we hope that using our character sheets can encourage you to become all you can be as a writer....

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Editing Dialogue

Posted by on Feb 8, 2016 in Featured Articles | 3 comments

Editing Dialogue

Recently I had a conversation with an author about the differences between editing dialogue and editing narrative. It occurred to me that this is something I do automatically, but I don’t really know if it’s a hard and fast rule or if editors follow their own rules. Maybe editors don’t make adjustments or aren’t consciously aware they make them. Perhaps I over think things. Anything’s possible. So, me being me, I decided to try to put down on paper some of the reasons I edit dialogue and narrative differently and what adjustments I make in my editing and commentary. Dialogue is more casual than narrative. Most people do not speak proper English. We use contractions—hell, we make up contractions on the fly. We speak in fragments and run-on sentences, and we mispronounce words. Young children confuse verb tense, and those learning the language misuse words altogether. Dialogue isn’t always perfect. Dialogue conveys a character’s voice. Often, the technical “rules” of writing that make narrative clean and concise can squelch the voice of a character significantly. Take comma splices, for example. We’re all well aware comma splices are a no-no when used more than very occasionally in narrative. However, we speak in comma splices all the time. At least, I do. I’m from New York, I talk fast. See what I did right there? If I were to speak that sentence, there would barely be a pause, much less a stop. Yes, technically I could use a semicolon, but I actually like to leave the comma splice to show the speed, urgency, or sense of united thought those two separate phrases are meant to convey. The same can be said for fragments—perhaps your character is impatient and barks one-word orders a lot—or run-on sentences—maybe your character is a little absentminded and loses her train of thought, resulting in a long, drawn-out ramble. These “mistakes” add another layer to the picture you’re painting of your character. Dialogue conveys a character’s emotions. A character’s words are predominant in drawing an emotion from the reader, but how the dialogue is punctuated can aid in that goal… or not. If I were to read a paragraph of narrative full of ellipses, em dashes, and fragments, I might twitch a little. Okay, a lot. But imagine your character were a small child attempting to relive a frightening experience for the sake of therapy or a police report. Those pauses, stops and starts, stutters, and bits of words would be crucial in showing her terror. So, what adjustments do I make when I’m editing? Overall, I tend to ease up on the rules when it comes to dialogue as long as the reasoning behind deviation from the rules is valid. (Please note that this does not pertain to dialogue tags, which I will edit to death if they’re too creative.) But if Sam and Joe are having a chat, and suddenly all structure and format disappears from their dialogue without an obvious reason, I’ll mark it up and most likely leave a comment wondering what the point was. Conversely, if there’s dialogue between children and every sentence is grammatically correct with perfect syntax, punctuation and spelling, I’ll most probably flag that, too. What differences between narrative and dialogue would you, as an author, flag to edit differently?...

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When Good Body Parts Go Bad

Posted by on Feb 2, 2016 in Featured Articles | 0 comments

When Good Body Parts Go Bad

We’ve all read that story. You know the one with independently moving body parts, right? This is called disembodied motion, and it’s an issue that can worm its way into the writing of even the most seasoned of authors. But is all disembodied motion bad? Of course not. As with most things in the English language, there’s an exception to almost every rule. But this article doesn’t focus on when to use disembodied motion. It’s to help authors learn how to spot it in their own writing and how to fix it. What Is Disembodied Motion? Let’s start with a blatant example of disembodied motion. When Martin entered the room, his eyes flew across to Jane. When she spotted him by the potted rhododendron, her eyes traveled up his lean body. His legs carried him over to her, and when he reached her, his fingers caressed her cheek. Before her mouth could speak, his lips caught hers in a searing kiss. As you can see, there are many body parts moving independently of Martin and Jane with very little interaction between these two because their body parts are doing it for them. It’s as if their body parts are making decisions without the characters’ permissions. The Problem There are several reasons why disembodied motion should be avoided. It creates a disconnect between the action happening and the characters themselves. The focus shifts to their body parts, which take center stage and cuts out the actual person responsible for those actions. It lacks real emotion because, honestly, how much emotion do one’s legs feel? When taken literally, it can be quite funny, which probably wasn’t the author’s intention. And let’s not forget the phrase “I found myself…” which creates a disembodied state for the characters to do actions as if they’ve lost control of their body and are powerless to stop their actions. The Fix So, what’s an author to do to safeguard their manuscript from good body parts gone bad? Look for places where your story feels impersonal, especially in scenes with physical interactions between characters. Search the manuscript for body parts—hands, eyes, head, fingers, legs, lips, etc.—and determine if they’ve hijacked the action. Ask your critique group or beta readers to pay attention to those quirky phrases such as “she threw her hands in the air.” Hire an editor (cough – Write Divas – cough) who understands how to spot and correct disembodied motion. Find better ways to describe the scene without resorting to disembodied motion. This can be difficult when trying to avoid the repetition of a word when describing an action. So how would I have fixed the disembodied motion in my atrocious paragraph above about our two would-be lovers? When Martin entered the room, he spied Jane in the corner. At the same moment, she looked up and met his gaze. Giving him an appreciative once-over, she smiled and his pulse quickened. In his haste to get to her, he almost tripped over that half-dead rhododendron she’d been torturing since college. When he reached her side, he caressed her cheek and gave her a searing kiss to show her the power she had over him. The next time you write a scene and you suspect body parts have become more important than the characters who own them,...

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Review: Promise Me Forever (Promise Me #4) by Paige Weaver

Posted by on Jan 25, 2016 in Diva Review | 0 comments

Review: Promise Me Forever (Promise Me #4) by Paige Weaver

From the New York Times, USA Today, and international bestselling author, Paige Weaver, comes the epic conclusion of her fourth book, Promise Me Once… In the weak, there is strength. In despair, there is hope. My world was dark. Survival was tough. But the end of the world saved me. It taught me to love. To go on living. In its darkness, I found myself. In its bleakness, I found hope. I wasn’t the girl I used to be. I was stronger. I was with the man I loved. The cowboy with a quiet presence who took what he wanted, including me. He showed me love and gave me strength. He touched me and I was never the same. I didn’t want to love him but I couldn’t resist. I was his. But the world was trying to tear us apart. Love may save us or it may be our destruction. We may die for it or sacrifice everything to keep it. The choice will not be simple. Live or die. Love or lose. I was about to find out which one… Diva Review: FOUR STARS The latest installment in the Promise Me series by Paige Weaver didn’t disappoint! I have followed Weaver’s post-apocalyptic series since the beginning. The first two books were about Ryder and Maddie and their struggle around the start of the EMP attack. I loved reading how they navigated their new world and how they survived the harsh environment. Just think: What would you do if an EMP knocked out everything in the US.? What kind of life do you think would be left for people who are so dependent on electronics? It essentially puts civilization back more than 100 years. The way of life everyone has come to know would be forever lost. It’s very compelling. Check out my reviews for Promise Me Darkness and Promise Me Light. The post-apocalyptic world interests me so much. I really devoured all these books. When Cash and Cat’s story popped up in book 3, Promise Me Once, I was super excited. In part because the series was still going and because Cash was one of my favorite character from the first two books. He’s that loner cowboy type that had so much brewing under the surface. Yum! In book 3 we venture outside life on the farm where book 1 and 2 were set. The reader got to see more of what the world turned into as a result of the EMP attack. The war, the way people had to survive, and how humanity had turned into something unrecognizable. Cash and Cat were the main focus of book 3, and we learned of their shared past while seeing them reunite and fall for each other as they face the dangers of a vigilante type town called Hillside—a town thrown back in time. It’s the Old West reinvented. Men are in charge, they rule with martial law, women have taken a submissive role, and the leaders have no qualms about killing to protect what they think is right. Even if their version of right is really very wrong. Phew! Of course, Cash and Cat, along with their family, get mixed up with Hillside, their lawlessness, and the men who personally harmed Cash’s sister and Cat. Promise Me Forever...

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Drawing An Emotional Reaction From Your Reader

Posted by on Jan 18, 2016 in Featured Articles | 0 comments

Drawing An Emotional Reaction From Your Reader

Drawing an emotional reaction from your reader Recently I read a sequel with a male lead whose inner struggles nearly cost him everything—his love, his job, his child—and I cried at no less than three points in the story. As he pulled himself back from the edge and turned his life around, I wondered what about this character and his story prompted such a visceral reaction from me. The easy answer is the fact that it’s a sequel, I loved the first book, and I’d anxiously awaited the second. But that’s not quite the whole picture. Because I’ve read plenty of books—and their sequels—and they don’t all pull an emotional reaction from me. But the ones that do… well, they have a few things in common. So, as an author, what can you do to pull this reaction from your reader? First of all, give the reader a character they can care about. Not a perfect Mary Sue, but a real person. Give your characters flaws; it makes them more believable, more human. Readers are more likely to react to a character they can relate to, whether in a good situation or a bad. Give your character layers and depth. And moods. We all have them. The more real you make her, the easier it will be for your reader to connect. Conversely, give your reader someone they can loathe. But remember that villains have layers, too. No bad guy is 100% bad all the time. Some of the very best villains of all time have a not-so-bad side. In your story line, create realistic situations, but don’t be too careful or cautious. In life, good things AND bad things naturally happen. Babies are born. People die. In your story, good and bad should both occur. Characters are born. Characters die. Yes, I said it. Kill someone off. Don’t be afraid. One of the best things about writing is the godlike aspect it brings the author. You can always reincarnate that character, or aspects of that character, in a future story. Or—dun, dun, dun—bring him back as his evil twin! Ha, kidding. No, really. Don’t. In addition to the story line you create for them, also force your characters to actually be human beings and live. Wives get promoted. Fathers lose their jobs.  Kids choose to use drugs. An alcoholic takes her first step into an AA meeting. People have to make life or death decisions and hard choices, which create conflict. And without conflict, there can be no resolution. Don’t forget to foreshadow, foreshadow, foreshadow. For any emotional reaction—good, bad, or something in between—anticipation is imperative. It could be the slow burn of sexual tension or a sick feeling of dread that builds until the reader is begging for it to end. Whether it’s subtle or blatant, use foreshadowing to your advantage. But then don’t be afraid to throw a curve ball. Depending on the curve, that can rank right up there with “kill off your character.” Nothing brings out a reaction from the reader like a curve ball. Often the reaction is something akin to “tosses book across the room” or “how could she kill off Sam?” Sometimes it’s more positive, like “Wow, I didn’t see that coming.” And that’s when you know you did it right....

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Writing Conferences Page 2

Posted by on Jan 12, 2016 in Featured Articles | 0 comments

Writing Conferences Page 2

Writing Conferences 2016 (July – December) Be sure to check back often as I will continue to add to this list when I find new writing conferences. Please note that this is not an all-inclusive list, so if I missed your writing conference, e-mail me the particulars at contact@writedivas.com/old or leave a comment below and I’ll add it. For events scheduled for the first half of 2016, please click through to the January through June page.   July Jul. 5-9, 2016 – ThrillerFest XI, New York City, NY Jul. 9-16, 2016 – Antioch Writers’ Workshop Summer Program, Yellow Springs, OH Jul. 10-17, 2016 – Tin House Summer Writers’ Workshop, Newport, OR Jul. 13-16, 2016 – Romance Writers of America Annual Conference, San Diego, CA Jul. 15-17, 2016 – 2016 AWC Writers Conference, Birmingham, AL Jul. 15-17, 2016 – ConGregate 3, High Point, NC Jul. 16, 2016 – All Write Now! Writers’ Conference, Cape Girardeau, MO Jul. 20-24, 2016 – Writing the Rockies 2016, Gunnison, CO Jul. 21-23, 2016 – Midwest Writers Workshop, Muncie, IN Jul. 21-24, 2016 – West Virginia Writers’ Workshop, Morgantown, WV Jul. 24-29, 2016 – Napa Valley Writers’ Conference, St. Helena, CA Jul. 24-30, 2016 – Stonecoast Writers’ Conference, Portland, ME Jul. 24-31, 2016 – Taos Summer Writers’ Conference, Santa Fé, NM Jul. 28-31, 2016 – Cascade Writers Agent, Editor, Authors Critiques & Pitch Workshop, Kent, WA Jul. 28-31, 2016 – Leap of Faith PNWA Conference, Seattle, WA Jul. 28-31, 2016 – Mystery Writers Conference, Corte Madera, CA Jul. 30, 2016 – NW Book Festival, Portland, OR   August Aug. 1-2, 2016 – Martha’s Vineyard Book Festival, Edgartown & Chilmark, MA Aug. 3-6, 2016 – Greater Philly Christian Writers Conference, Langhorne, PA Aug. 4-7, 2016 – Cape Code Writers Center Conference, Hyannis, MA Aug. 4-7, 2016 – Mendocino Coast Writers Conference, Fort Bragg, CA Aug. 5-6, 2016 – Florida Authors & Publisher Association Conference, Orlando, FL Aug. 6, 2016 – Chapter One Young Writers Conference, St. Charles, IL Aug. 10-20, 016 – Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Ripton, VT Aug. 11-14, 2016 – Writers’ Police Academy, Green Bay, WI Aug. 12-13, 2016 – Mid-Atlantic Fiction Writers Institute Conference, Hagerstown, MD Aug. 12-14, 2016 – Willamette Writers Conference, Portland, OR Aug. 12-14, 2016 – Writer’s Digest Annual Conference, New York City, NY Aug. 15-18, 2016 – Oregon Christian Writers Summer Conference, Jantzen Beach, OR Aug. 18-21, 2016 – Killer Nashville Writers’ Conference, Nashville, TN Aug. 20, 2016 – Mississippi Book Festival, Jackson, MS Aug. 25-28, 2016 – American Christian Fiction Writers Conference, Nashville, TN   September Sep. 12-18, 2016 – Brooklyn Book Festival, New York City, NY Sep. 15-18, 2016 – Surprise Valley Writers’ Conference, Cedarville, CA Sep. 16-17, 2016 – Kentucky Women Writers Conference, Lexington, KY Sep. 23, 2016 – Penned Con 2016, St. Louis, MO Sep. 23-24, 2016 – Ridgefield Writers Conference 2016, Ridgefield, CT Sep. 23-25, 2016 – Chicago Writers Conference, Chicago, IL Sep. 24, 2016 – Tallahassee Writers Conference, Tallahassee, FL Sep. 30-Oct. 2, 2016 – Write on the Sound Writers’ Conference, Edmonds, WA Sep. (TBD), 2016 – St. Louis Small Press Expo, St. Louis, MO   October Oct. 6-8, 2016 – Ozark Creative Writers Conference, Eureka Springs, AR Oct. 7-9, 2016 – Wik’16 Writing and Illustrating for Kids, Birmingham, AL Oct. 15, 2016 – African American Author’s & Empowerment Expo, Timonium,...

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Writing Conferences

Posted by on Jan 11, 2016 in Featured Articles | 2 comments

Writing Conferences

Writing Conferences 2016 (January – June) Be sure to check back often as I will continue to add to this list when I find new writing conferences. Please note that this is not an all-inclusive list, so if I missed your writing conference, e-mail me the particulars at contact@writedivas.com/old or leave a comment below and I’ll add it. For events scheduled for the second half of 2016, please click through to the July through December page.   January Jan. 15-17, 2016 – Compel, Polish, Pitch & Sign Writers’ Conference, Salt Lake City, UT Jan. 15-18, 2016 – Winter Poetry & Prose Getaway, Atlantic City, NJ Jan 16, 2016 – Fun in the Sun (mini) Conference, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Jan. 16-23, 2016 – Writers in Paradise Conference, St. Petersburg, FL Jan. 22-23, 2016 – Write on the Red Cedar, East Lansing, MI Jan. 22-24, 2016 – San Diego State University Writers’ Conference, San Diego, CA Jan. 23-24, 2016 – Children’s Picture Book Writers & Illustrators Conference, Corte Madera, CA Jan. 26, 2016 – UVU Book Academy Conference, Orem, UT   February Feb. 4-7, 2016 – Coastal Magic Convention, Daytona Beach, FL Feb. 11-13, 2016 – Life, the Universe, and Everything, Provo, UT Feb. 11-14, 2016 – 2016 San Francisco Writers Conference, San Francisco, CA Feb. 11-14, 2016 – Savannah Book Festival, Savannah, GA Feb. 12-13, 2016 – South Coast Writers Conference, Gold Beach, OR Feb. 12-14, 2016 – 17th Annual SCBWI Winter Conference, New York, NY Feb. 12-15, 2016 – Southern California Writers’ Conference, San Diego, CA Feb. 12-17, 2016 – Aloha Romance Writer Rendezvous, Laie, HI Feb. 18-20, 2016 – Amelia Island Book Festival, Amelia Island, FL Feb. 18-20, 2016 – Desert Nights, Rising Stars Writers Conference, Tempe, AZ Feb. 19-21, 2016 – Asheville Christian Writers Conference, Asheville, NC Feb. 19-21, 2016 – Deckle Edge Literary Festival, Columbia, SC Feb. 25-28, 2016 – Left Coast Crime 2016, Phoenix, AZ Feb. 25-28, 2016 – Sleuthfest 2016, Deerfield Beach, FL Feb. 26-27, 2016 – Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration, Natchez, MS Feb. 26-28, 2016 – Annual Digital Author and Indie Publishing Conference, Van Nuys, CA Feb. 27, 2016 – Oregon Christian Writers Winter 2016 One-Day Conference, Salem, OR   March Mar. 4-6, 2016 – The Catholic Writers’ Conference, Online Mar. 5, 2016 – WordCrafters Writing Festival, Eugene, OR Mar. 7-9, 2016 – Digital Book World Conference + Expo, New York City, NY Mar. 10-13, 2016 – New York Pitch Conference, New York City, NY Mar. 11-13, 2016 – Illustrators’ Day and Springmingle’16, Decatur, GA Mar. 12, 2016 – Bay to Ocean Writers Conference, Wye Mills, MD Mar. 12-13, 2016 – Dahlonega Literary Festival, Dahlonega, GA Mar. 12-13, 2016 – Tucson Festival of Books, Tucson, AZ Mar. 16-20, 2016 – Virginia Festival of the Book, Charlottesville, VA Mar. 18-20, 2016 – MidSouthCon, Memphis, TN Mar. 18-20, 2016 – Temecula Valley Indie Christian Writers Conference & Book Fair, Temecula, CA Mar. 18-22, 2016 – Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, Mount Hermon, CA Mar. 19, 2016 – Mid-South Christian Writers’ Conference, Memphis, TN Mar. 19-20, 2016 – Create Something Magical Conference, Iselin, NJ Mar. 30-Apr. 2, 2016 – AWP Conference & Bookfair, Los Angeles, CA Mar. 30-Apr. 3, 2016 – Tennessee Williams New Orléans Literary Festival, New Orléans, LA Mar. 31-Apr. 2, 2016 – National Undergraduate Literature Conference, Ogden, UT   April Apr. 1-2, 2016 – Palm Beach Book Festival, Palm Beach, FL Apr. 1-2, 2016 – Write2Ignite! Conference, Tigerville, SC Apr....

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New Release: Homewrecker Incorporated by S. Simone Chavous

Posted by on Jan 5, 2016 in Diva Promotions | 0 comments

New Release: Homewrecker Incorporated by S. Simone Chavous

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE TODAY!!!  TITLE: Homewrecker Incorporated Author: S. Simone Chavous Publisher: Indie Pages: 326 Genre: Romance Without love, marriage is just business. At least that’s what Claudia Mason tells the women who seek her firm’s unique services. With wealthy husbands who see their wedding rings as meaningless pieces of jewelry, they trust Claudia to do whatever is necessary to gather the hard evidence needed to shatter an ironclad prenup. She is the best in the business and has yet to meet a mark she couldn’t get the goods on—solidifying her belief that no man can be trusted. After landing a client who is her ticket to retirement, she is on top of the world. Until a chance encounter with Greyston Michaels turns her carefully controlled world upside down. Greyston shows Claudia a part of herself she thinks she’s lost, making her question everything she believes about men—and love. But in Claudia’s world, following her heart is bad for business. And business is everything. Exclusive Excerpt   After a brief moment of stunned gawking, I managed a smile and tore my gaze from those sexy, full lips. I didn’t know how I forced my legs to move me onto that elevator. Once I was on, I turned my back in an attempt to guard myself from him. “What floor?” His tone sounded amused, although the alluring timbre of his voice sent a shiver down my spine. The one we were standing on would have sufficed for what I had in mine. “Um, seven,” I replied over my shoulder. My voice caught slightly in my throat. God, he smelled divine, like leather and fresh spring rain. He reached forward around me. I could feel his eyes on me while he pressed the button to take us up. It was hard to breathe so near him, as if all the oxygen burned away by the sizzling attraction between us. I’d known he was gorgeous before, I’d met plenty of attractive men in my life, but this was different. I tried again to remind myself he was just another job. I couldn’t afford to lose control. Still, standing so close to him, I realized what I’d seen of him before was like gazing at a distant star. You recognized its light, its beauty, but it wasn’t until you were sucked into its orbit you could fully appreciate its power. That’s how I felt being alone in his presence. As if some invisible yet undeniable force was drawing me in. Gravity. “This must be my lucky day.” I chanced a glance over my shoulder as he resumed his relaxed position against the wall, seemingly unaffected. My stomach tightened and I pulled the portfolio closer to my chest. I was certain he could hear my heart pounding in the relative silence. No, fuck that. I had to get it together. It was just a simple case of instant chemistry, and he was just another man—a job, nothing more, nothing less. Sure, I’d never felt anything like it before, but that didn’t matter. So what if he’d caught me off guard, and I’d wanted to fuck him the instant I laid eyes on him. It might not have been exactly what I’d planned for, but this was an opportunity, not only to get the job...

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New Release: SNACK by Emme Burton

Posted by on Jan 5, 2016 in Diva Promotions | 0 comments

New Release: SNACK by Emme  Burton

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE TODAY!!!  TITLE: SNACK Author: Emme Burton Publisher: Indie Pages: 172 Genre: Romance   Marcus “Snack” Snackenberg is a born lady-killer. When Minnie Cooper moves back to her dad’s hometown as a child with her two brothers and Star Wars action figures in tow, they become immediate friends. By junior high, Minnie, although unaware, is in love with him. Snack is completely in touch with his feelings for her. Sometimes the villain in the story isn’t a person. Sometimes it’s time. And space. And fear. Fear of losing the best friend you’ve ever had. Snack. An overnight romance… twenty-six years in the making.     Exclusive Excerpt Snack plops down on the bed next to where I’m standing. Reaching out for my boxers, he takes the hem between his thumb and forefinger and tugs it lightly. The back of his finger grazes my upper thigh, leaving tingly warmth in its wake. “Nice boxers,” he says. “Whose are they?” I have no idea. Probably my dad’s or Clip’s. I shrug. “I’ll bring you some of mine. I only want you wearing mine from now on.” “Uh, O-Kay.” I stutter in response to his demand and most definitely his touch. I have no problem with that. Must be another one of Snack’s weird possessive things. Snack twists the fabric of my boxers around his fingers and pulls me toward him. “Come here and kiss me. I can’t believe you haven’t kissed me yet.” My heart thumps out of control and my brain is frozen. I’ve heard actors say things like that in movies, but in real life? I guess it does actually happen.   Links Amazon || iBooks || Kobo || Facebook || Goodreads || Twitter  About The Author Emme Burton is the author of the Better Than series: Better Than Me, Fix It For Us and most recently Still Into You. A standalone, SNACK, is coming in Winter 2016. She lives in St. Louis, Missouri with her amazing husband and sons, and her “fur boy.” Emme has never, ever been lost in a mall either as a child or an adult. Her mother, and now her family, have always known where to find her. At the...

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